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Dry Eye Center of Lancaster with Dr. Jon Andrews in Lancaster PA

Our mission is to evaluate and manage any type of ocular surface disease that affects vision and the comfort of our patient’s eyes.

Our dry eye clinic is dedicated to treating just dry eye disease and types of ocular surface disease.

As a tertiary clinic or a referral-based clinic, physicians and doctors who have unsuccessfully tried to treat their severe dry eye patients on their own refer their patients to us for our expertise and dry eye technology.

From preoperative cataract patients who suffer from extreme dryness to chronic contact lens sufferers who can’t find relief from either medicines or other dry treatments in the past, our practice offers the latest and most effective treatments. For example, we fit medically necessary scleral lenses for extreme dry eye cases. Scleral lenses brought relief to patients who failed with medicated eye drops, LipiFlow treatments, or autologous serum. When one’s eyes can’t respond to a specific treatment, the eye may have become so dry that nothing else works.

Our dry eye center treats every kind of dry eye patient — not just those with a blocked tear duct. Poor tear development and even certain eye diseases like Sjogren's, rheumatoid arthritis, or lupus require a more rigorous treatment that our practice provides.

Our technology includes adenovirus detector called AdenoPlus, tear osmolarity testing from TearLab, a corneal topographer, OCT, and more.

If you need a dry eye consultation in Lancaster, contact our office today.

For practitioners & referring doctors, we also provide SICCA Ocular staining scores upon request.

Dry Eye Syndrome with man in Lancaster, PA
Dry Eye Syndrome with girl in Lancaster, PA

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

Dry Eye Syndrome, or DES, is a condition caused by a lack of naturally producing tears. Tears are an essential aspect of eye health because they lubricate the surface of the eyes, keeping them moist and comfortable. When the body is unable to produce an adequate amount of tears, the eyes can begin to dry out, leading to itchy, red, and painful eyes.

At Optometric Associates, we are leaders in treatments for Dry Eye Syndrome patients in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. If you or a loved one suffers from DES, speak with Dr. Jonathan Andrews and schedule a consultation to learn how we can help.

What Are Tears Made Of?

Tears are more than just fluid in the eye; they have a chemical makeup comprised of water, enzymes, proteins, metabolites, lipids, and mucins.

Tears are important because they keep your eyes well-lubricated and protect them from foreign bodies or dust particles, which can cause irritation. When an insufficient amount of tears is produced in the tear ducts, Dry Eye Syndrome occurs.

What are tear elements and why are they important?

Enzymes are proteins that cause a chemical reaction inside the body

Proteins are molecules containing amino acids that are found in tissues in the body

Metabolites are small molecules that are related to metabolism

Lipids are molecules with an oily substance which contain healthy fats

Mucins are glycoproteins that helps cells stick together

What Are Common Symptoms of Dry Eye?

The most frequent types of Dry Eye symptoms include:

  • Blurry vision
  • Burning sensation
  • Gritty feeling
  • Itchy eyes
  • Redness
  • Stinging
  • Soreness
  • Watery eyes

It may seem ironic, but one symptom of DES is watery eyes. This occurs when the body attempts to self-soothe the dryness by producing excessive tears, a condition known as Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS). The tears lack a sufficient amount of water, so although these tears may provide temporary relief, the excessiveness of the tear production isn’t healthy.

Who Is at Risk for Developing Dry Eye Syndrome?

Like other diseases and eye conditions, there are some people who are more susceptible to developing DES. Age, gender, medical conditions, even the environment can contribute to sensitivity to dry eyes.

Medical Conditions

Certain medical conditions can make Dry Eye more prevalent. Patients with any of the following diseases may notice signs of DES symptoms:

  • Arthritis, an inflammation of the joints
  • Blepharitis, an inflammation of the eyelid, usually caused by skin conditions such as dandruff or rosacea
  • Diabetes, a condition causing high blood glucose levels
  • Glaucoma, a disease of the optic nerve, which causes vision loss
  • Hypertension, high blood pressure in the arteries
  • Lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease that causes damage to healthy tissue
  • Thyroid Disorder, when the tissues that surround the eyes become swollen or inflamed
  • Vitamin A Deficiency, when there is an insufficient amount of Vitamin A, which normally helps protect the cornea

Environmental Factors

People who live in areas with heavy winds or with dusty or dry air may find that their eyes often feel dry. Being around smoke or hair dryers can cause the same reaction. Being in direct aim of a heater or air conditioning unit can also dry out the eyes.

Gender

Women are more prone to DES because of hormonal changes due to pregnancy, birth control, and menopause. Women over age 50 have a 50% greater risk of developing Dry Eye than men of the same age. Additionally, women tend to visit their doctor more often than men and at earlier stages of discomfort, so diagnosing the condition in women is more common.

Age

According to the National Eye Institute, the risk of experiencing DES goes up with age. That’s because the natural tears of the eye decrease over time, which is a natural part of aging. As the patient’s tear production diminishes, signs of Dry Eye increase.

Dry Eye Syndrome in Lancaster, PA
Medical Treatment for Dry Eye in Lancaster, PA
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Dr. Jonathan Andrews

Dr. Jonathan Andrews is a Pennsylvania native and alumnus of both Indiana University of Pennsylvania and The Ohio State University. The son of Dr. Wolfram Andrews, an Optometrist in Lancaster County, PA, Dr. Jonathan Andrews grew up on a small property in rural New Holland, PA. He spent much of...

Treatment for Dry Eye Syndrome

Dr. Jonathan Andrews treats patients from all over Lancaster who have Dry Eye. Our staff has the experience and knowledge needed to help give you relief from DES symptoms and improve your quality of life.

Depending on your specific case, we may recommend artificial tears or lubricant eye drops to produce tears to moisten and make your eyes feel more comfortable. Prescription drops can help stimulate tear production and, in some cases, steroids can provide significant short-term relief.

For patients with more severe DES, the doctor may suggest the use of punctal plugs. These tiny devices are placed inside the tear duct to block tears from draining. As the natural moisture is prevented from leaking out, it remains in the eye and coats it properly, keeping it lubricated and comfortable.

Scleral lenses can provide effective relief as well. These are custom-designed rigid contact lenses with a large diameter that cover the entire sclera (the white part of the eye) without touching the cornea. Scleral lenses contain a tiny pool of water, providing constant moisture to dry eyes.

Medications and Dry Eye

All medications include warnings of possible side effects which some patients may experience. There are certain categories of medications that are known to decrease natural tear production, such as:

  • Antidepressants
  • Antihistamines
  • Anxiety medications
  • Birth control pills
  • Blood pressure medication
  • Decongestants

If you are taking any of these medications and feeling any signs of Dry Eye, speak with Dr. Jonathan Andrews about some alternative medications or treatments to alleviate your symptoms

Short-Term Effects of Dry Eye Syndrome

Many symptoms of Dry Eye Syndrome last for the short term, meaning, they can fade with proper treatment or sometimes, on their own. Blurry vision, itchy or red eyes, and stinging can be treated effectively and perhaps eventually disappear.

Long-Term Effects of Dry Eye Syndrome

Some symptoms of Dry Eye Syndrome have long-term effects, which means that they can last for months or even years. These may include:

  • Corneal abrasions or ulcers
  • Long-term inflammation
  • Vision impairment

Corneal abrasions can become serious if left untreated. They often heal on their own, but in more severe cases, prescription creams or bandage contact lenses may be needed for more efficient treatment. In cases of vision impairment from Dry Eye Syndrome, we can help.

These long-term effects of Dry Eye can negatively impact your life. Sensitivity to light and difficulty driving are 2 primary examples of everyday tasks that can become restricted with severe Dry Eye Syndrome. This leads to a lower quality of life.

If you suffer from Dry Eye and are ready for a solution to your painful symptoms, contact Dr. Jonathan Andrews and the staff at Optometric Associates. We are here to help you experience better vision today.

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